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Caitlin Scarano’s “Pitcher of Cream” selected for the Best Small Fictions anthology

Best Small Fictions 2016 coverCaitlin Scarano‘s “Pitcher of Cream” has been selected for the Queen’s Ferry Press Best Small Fiction anthology!

Caitlin’s story recently won our 2015 Flash Fiction Contest, judged by Laura Ellen Joyce. It was published on our website, and it will be re-released as a limited-run micro-chap later this month. The micro-chap will be available for free at the 2016 AWP Conference in Los Angeles, CA. Caitlin will be doing a signing at our exhibitor table (#1238) on Thursday, March 31st from 3:00pm to 4:00pm.

Last year’s Innovative Short Fiction Contest judge, Amelia Gray, also had her piece “These Are the Fables” selected for the Best Small Fictions anthology. Additionally, Amelia’s story “On a Pleasant Afternoon, Every Battle Is Recalled” was named a finalist.

John Englehardt‘s “This Is Great But You Don’t Need It” was also named as a semifinalist—this piece was originally published on our website and was made into a micro-chap for the 2015 AWP Conference in Minneapolis, MN.

Lastly, Daniel Aristi (former contributor to our website) had his Sand story, “Tempus Fugit,” selected for publication, and Mercedes Lawry (former contributor to our website) was named a semifinalist for her recent Cleaver Magazine story, “Was there transposition?

We’re excited to see so many contributors and friends of The Conium Review on the long list and short list for Best Small Fictions, and we hope you’ll all pick up a copy when Queen’s Ferry Press releases the anthology later this year. The full list of semifinalist, finalists, and winners is available on the Queen’s Ferry Press website.

James R. Gapinski’s favorite books of 2015

To wrap-up the year, our managing editor, James R. Gapinski, chimes in with his top five books of 2015. A few days ago, Melissa Reddish also shared her list.

Binary Star, by Sarah Gerard

If you want predictable syntax crammed into neat boxes, look elsewhere. Binary Star takes risks. Come for the inventive structure, stay for the characters who seem to be in a constant state or implosion and/or explosion.

Scrapper, by Matt Bell

Scrapper tells a riveting story set in a near-future version of Detroit, ravaged by climate change. Its unassuming blue collar protagonist has waaaaaaay more shit going on than first meets the eye. This book is its own masterclass in character development.

The Seven Good Years, by Etgar Keret (Translated by Sondra Silverston, Miriam Shlesinger, Jessica Cohen, and Anthony Berris)

Etgar Keret’s memoir explores the seven years between the birth of his son and the death of his father. Yes, the book builds toward a death, but it’s more about celebrating life. And it’s filled with the sense wonder and whimsy that have become a staple of Keret’s work.

Gutshot, by Amelia Gray

The stories in Gutshot have a visceral intensity to them. They rip open your perceptions of what a story is and can be. They scream at you and dare you to flinch. Yeah, you might bleed out by the end, but you’ll feel alive the whole goddamn time.

 Citizen, by Claudia Rankine

I’m not surprised that Citizen is also on Melissa’s top-five list as Book I Would Slip into Everyone’s Bag When They Weren’t Looking. I gave this book to my partner over the holidays—then she received a second copy from her sister. When you read this book, you want to share it. And you want to share it quickly. These pages have urgency. You’ll finish it in one sitting, and if you’re not already a proponent of #BlackLivesMatter, you will be. Read it. Now.

Amelia Gray at Late Night Library’s “All Fines Forgiven”

amelia headshotAmelia Gray (our recent contest judge, author of Gutshot, and other awesomeness) is coming to Portland! She’ll be performing at the Late Night Library event, “All Fines Forgiven.” The event is a book-themed variety show, with performances and talk segments. What is Amelia’s segment going to be all about? We’ll see, but our managing editor thinks maybe it will involve knife throwing and/or chainsaw juggling (not making any promises, but not ruling it out either). Other performers include musician Whitney Mongé, Natalie Graham, Carola Dibbell, and Dao Strom. Arthur Bradford hosts.

Friday, October 23rd at the Clinton Theater in PDX at 7:00pm. Find more details and purchase tickets through the Late Night Library website.

2016 Seersucker Writers Workshop

The 2016 Seersucker Writers Workshop is now accepting applications. Our recent contest judge, Amelia Gray, is one of the visiting faculty. Zach Powers, a recent contributor to The Conium Review, is also one of this year’s special guests! The other faculty and guest writers include Arna Hemenway, Patricia Lockwood, Chad Faries, Sjohnna McCray, Alexis Orgera, and Gale Marie Thompson.
The Seersucker Writers Workshop is a program of Seersucker Liver, a literary nonprofit in Savannah, Georgia designed to promote the local literary community through reading performances and workshops, featuring national, regional, and local writers. The workshop runs from February 3rd to February 7th, 2016 in downtown Savannah. More details and registration info are available on the Seersucker Live website.
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